Home Lifestyle 4 Critical Things You Need to Know About the Global Talent Independent Program

4 Critical Things You Need to Know About the Global Talent Independent Program

by Alsion Lurie
Global Talent Independent Program

According to a recent report by the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the country’s population increased by 194,400 people in 2020 due to overseas migration, bringing the total number of migrants living in Australia to 7.6 million. It is a trend that is expected to increase in the coming years. One of the contributors to this is the Global Talent Visa Program.

The global talent independent program is a way for talented and accomplished individuals to work and migrate to Australia. This program allows the country to attract the smartest and the best individuals to help grow a better economy. Here are the essential things you need to know about this program.

What Exactly is the Global Talent Independent Program?

According to the Australian Government Department of Home Affairs, the Global Talent Independent (GTI) program is designed to help ten future-focused sectors in the country to improve and innovate new technologies. It aims to provide talented individuals with permanent residency in Australia.

Currently, there are over 15,000 places available under the GTI program with Global Talent Officers located in different parts of the world. If you are a highly skilled individual and looking to migrate, you should consider Australia because it is a lifestyle destination that is one of the most prosperous and culturally diverse locations globally.

Who is Eligible for the Global Talent Independent Program?

Not all individuals are eligible for the global talent independent program because there are strict requirements. For instance, one must have an internationally recognised record of exceptional and outstanding achievement in their respective field. This field of expertise must also fit under the ten focused sectors, such as FinTech, DigiTech, and Agri-food, to name a few.

Some focused sectors also require that individuals have completed their PhD in the past three years or nearing completion, with an expected date of six months or less. Lastly, these individuals must attract a wage equivalent to the Fair Work High Income Threshold that is currently pegged at AUD 153,600.

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How to Apply for the Global Talent Independent Program?

To apply for the GTI program, an individual should get a unique identifier code issued by the Global Talent Officers and secure a nomination. Once these two requirements are fulfilled, the visa application itself will be processed.

Application for the GTI program is not free as it requires a government lodgement fee that includes payment for the visa of the main applicant and his or her dependents. The GTI program is a difficult process, and it would be best that you seek consultation from a reputable firm to assist you in the process.

How Long Does the Application Process Take?

The processing period for GTI programs varies for every individual as it is affected by several factors. For instance, the duration of the process may be faster for individuals that have a complete application and longer for people who have incomplete documents. It is paramount that you get help from reliable professionals to hasten the process.

The GTI program will help you live a better and more fulfilled career in your chosen field, which is why it is something that you should take seriously. Do not pass up the opportunity for having a stellar career in one of the most progressive countries in the world. Check out a reliable and trusted firm today, and let them assist you in the GTI program application process.

Author Bio:

Alison Lurie  is a farmer of words in the field of creativity. She is an experienced independent content writer with a demonstrated history of working in the writing and editing industry. She is a multi-niche content chef who loves cooking new things.

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